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Replacing Toyota 2ZZ-GE VVTL-I camshaft lift bolts at 105k miles…

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Firstly I’d like to thank the following two guide links, which give you all the information you need for this task:

Lift Bolt Replacement BY TeamCelica.com Tronix, Uansari and Lamar Vannoy

&

Targa90’s 7th Generation Celica Lift Bolt Replacement Tutorial

Despite the simplicity of this task I was dreading it a little, it was a must do job but I had no idea if these bolts had been replaced on my car or not.

Judging from my engine and how it looked I assumed not, everything is rather dusty in my engine bay but very undisturbed. Going by all the previous MOT and service history it’s been a very reliable motor and well looked after so I wasn’t expecting problems…

Two things I would advise you get for this task is a 5-25NM torque wrench and a cover sealant, since there are two points on the cover that need cleaning off and new sealant applied to on refitting the cam cover (see Targa90’s link for this).

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The cover needed some gentle persuasion to come off as you can imagine, you will notice it almost refuses to come off over in the right rear corner reason being that there is a vertical oil flow tube and it seals pretty tight. It will seem awkward when refitting the cover as well but just keep an eye on the tube and make sure to seat the cover back on as evenly as possible, the bolts will pull the cover back down snug.

When you get the cover off it might be ideal to wrap up the top of the exposed engine, especially if it’s windy and your engine is flailing bits of dust and dirt. Ideally you should give the coil pack recess and all the top section a hoover off first as the metal can be very fatigued by the elements.

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So as you can see I was lucky this time ! These bolts I’ve removed are revised ones but not the final versions, I believe with my car being built in the latter of 2002 it come with these from the factory. As you can see the wear is obvious, very more so on the intake bolt shown closest.

All in this job cost me £30.00 to do, the torque wrench, the two bolts and the sealant. I’m very pleased the bolts were not snapped or that they did snap during removal, as that makes things a lot more stressful !

Have a good day everyone.

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Can you make a mild steel exhaust last longer ?

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Something else I needed to fit was a new mid silencer on the Zafira, since the rubbish the garage fitted split along its plated seam after less than a year.

Luckily the new section I have is “rolled” instead of “pressed” meaning it only has one  long edge seam instead of two physical sections tacked together. So my plan for this is just to give the product more protection from the elements, it’s mild steel and it will fail eventually but it might help a little…

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Versachem is a good product, and it is a strong sealer so I have applied it to all the seam edges on the box, notice how it’s embedded into the small gaps nicely…

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Here is another example on the recesses, this only took about five minutes skimming the versachem wearing latex gloves (seriously use gloves as versachem is rather potent stuff).

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Spraying is also a rather quick task, since this is matte VHT it tends not to run so bad and even one coat looks rather tidy. Also it can be good to tape the edges to give a cleaner finish (not that anyone will see this work of art lol).

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After fifteen minutes I applied another quick coat.

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I applied the paint mostly to the ends and on the long seam edge, after five minutes of drying you see it goes to this flat matt colour and does not look too bad at all. To finish I sprayed the hanger sections also just to help protect the welds.

That concludes my little DIY post here on a little rust/corrosion protection for budget exhaust components, have a good day 🙂